• Krokodil

    Desomorphine, better known by its street name Krokodil, is around 8-10 times more potent than morphine with a powerful, fast-acting sedative high akin to that of heroin.
    This extremely addictive, injectable opioid is named, in part, because users report black or green scaly skin as a side effect – the flesh then starts to "harden, rot, and fall off," often in chunks. Addicts will usually die within two years of first use.
  • Tik (Crystal Meth)

    "Tik" is the South African street name for crystal methamphetamine.
    It has a very bad reputation in South Africa because it is more potent than other forms of meth and because it is so easily available. It started off as the drug of choice in poor communities because of its affordability, but has since spread to other levels of society.
  • Heroin (Whoonga/Nyaope)

    Heroin is an opioid drug that is synthesized from morphine, a naturally occurring substance extracted from the seed pod of the Asian opium poppy plant. Heroin usually appears as a white or brown powder or as a black sticky substance, known as “black tar heroin.”
    South Africa is currently experiencing an epedemic of heroin abuse in the form of cheap heroin nicknamed "whoonga", "nayaope" or "sugars".
  • Buttons (Mandrax)

    South Africa is the largest abuser of Mandrax in the world.
    Statistics show that Mandrax with Dagga is still the drug of preference in the largest parts of South Africa. Mandrax is mainly sold in the form of a tablet and is highly addictive.
  • Ecstasy

    Ecstasy is a synthetic, psychoactive drug that has similarities to both the stimulant amphetamine and the hallucinogen mescaline. It produces feelings of increased energy, euphoria, emotional warmth and empathy toward others, and distortions in sensory and time perception.
    Mixed with alcohol, Ecstasy is extremely dangerous and can, in fact, be deadly. So widespread has been the harm of this “designer drug,” that emergency room incidents skyrocketed by more than 1,200% after Ecstasy became the “club drug” of choice at all-night “rave” parties and dance clubs.
  • LSD

    Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD) (popular street name "Acid") - is the strongest and most popular hallucinogenic substance known.
    LSD users call an LSD experience a “trip,” typically lasting twelve hours or so. When things go wrong, which often happens, it is called a “bad trip,” another name for a living hell.
  • Prescription Medication

    Abuse of prescription drugs can be even riskier than the abuse of illegally manufactured drugs. The high potency of some of the synthetic (man-made) drugs available as prescription drugs creates a high overdose risk.
    The consequences of prescription drug abuse have been steadily worsening, reflected in increased treatment admissions, emergency room visits, and overdose deaths.
  • Alcohol

    Alcohol affects every organ in the drinker's body and can damage a developing fetus.
    Intoxication can impair brain function and motor skills; heavy use can increase risk of certain cancers, stroke, and liver disease.
  • Dagga

    By no means a "safe" or "soft" drug as is so often claimed.
    In some ways, the effect on a user's mental health for example, dagga can be more dangerous than heroin.
  • Tobacco

    Tobacco use is one of the leading causes of preventable illness and death. It causes many different cancers as well as chronic lung diseases such as emphysema and bronchitis, heart disease, pregnancy-related problems, and many other serious health problems.
    Each day, more than 3,200 people under 18 smoke their first cigarette, and approximately 2,100 youth and young adults become daily smokers.
  • Cocaine

    Extracted from coca leaves, cocaine was originally developed as a painkiller. It is most often sniffed, with the powder absorbed into the bloodstream through the nasal tissues. It can also be ingested or rubbed into the gums.
    Cocaine is one of the most dangerous drugs known to man. Once a person begins taking the drug, it has proven almost impossible to become free of its grip physically and mentally.
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Friday, 14 November 2014 10:46

Can Marijuana Cure?

 

Can Marijuana cure?
 
DRUG RESEARCH PORTAL

UK - 5,500 British babies born addicted to drugs!

Around 5,500 children born in Britain in the past five years – or three babies a day – were addicted to heroin, crack cocaine and other drugs from the mother's womb, official statistics reveal.

 Data from the Department of Health said that the newborns all showed 'neo-natal withdrawal symptoms' within the first few hours of life. The babies need specialized care to cope with severe vomiting, seizures, fever and breathing difficulties. They became hooked to drugs in the womb because their mothers continued taking drugs during pregnancy.

USA - Marijuana Users More Likely To Misuse Prescription Drugs
Individuals who use marijuana recreationally are more likely to misuse other drugs, including pain-controlling, but potentially addictive narcotics, sedatives and other prescription medications, according to a new national study issued by Quest Diagnostics, the world's leading provider of diagnostic information services. The key findings for marijuana use: Nearly half (45%) of patients who used marijuana recreationally also used other non-prescribed drugs -- most commonly sedatives and narcotic pain killers - compared to approximately one third (36%) of non-marijuana users. These findings suggest recreational marijuana users are 1.3 times more likely than non-marijuana users to use or combine potentially dangerous and addictive prescription and illicit drugs without a legitimate prescription or a clinician's oversight.

USA - Mental Illness Linked to Heavy Cannabis Use
People with mental illnesses are more than seven times more likely to use cannabis weekly compared to people without a mental illness, according to researchers from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) who studied U.S. data. "We know people with mental illness consume more cannabis, perhaps partially as a way to self- medicate psychiatric symptoms, but this data showed us the degree of the correlation between cannabis use, misuse, and mental illness," said Dr. Shaul Lev-ran, Adjunct Scientist at CAMH and Head of Addiction Medicine at the Sheba Medical Center, Israel. Among those with mental illness reporting at least weekly cannabis use, rates of use were particularly elevated for those with bipolar disorder, personality disorders and other substance use disorders.

USA - Marijuana Not Medicine, Addiction Experts Say
"Illinois should not legalize cannabis, and physicians should not write recommendations for patients to use marijuana for medical purposes a group of addiction medicine physicians said during a press conference. "There is no such thing as medical marijuana," Dr. Stuart Gitlow, MD, MPH, president of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) stated. Dr Andrea Barthwell, MD, an addiction medicine specialist called cannabis "unstable and unpredictable" and said that the drug should be subject to the same standards that apply to other medications. John Peterson, MD, president of the Illinois Society of Addiction Medicine, said "For every disease and disorder for which marijuana has been recommended, there is a better, FDA-approved medication."

USA - California cities can ban medical marijuana shops says court
In a land mark ruling, the California Supreme Court ruled, by a 7-0 vote, that local cities have the right to ban pot stores. The ruling came in a legal challenge to a ban enacted by the city of Riverside in 2010. "Today is the beginning of the end for the out of control marijuana movement in our state, "said Dr. Paul Chabot, President of the Coalition for a Drug Free California who supported Riversides and about 200 other Californian cities' bans on medical pot-shops. "We expect cities to take swift action in shutting down these illicit drug dealing operations." Chabot said. "Facilities that dispense medical marijuana may pose a danger of increased crime, congestion, blight, and drug abuse, and the extent of this danger may vary widely from community to community," the court said.

USA - Regular marijuana use by teens continues to be a concern

A 2012 survey by researchers at the University of Michigan was carried out in classrooms around the country, under a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). This shows that 6.5 percent of high school seniors smoke marijuana daily, up from 5.1 percent five years ago. Nearly 23 percent say they smoked it in the month prior to the survey, and just over 36 percent say they smoked within the previous year. For 10th graders, 3.5 percent said they use marijuana daily, with 17 percent reporting past month use and 28 percent reporting use in the past year.

USA - Top Substance Abuse Research Findings of 2012

The top substance abuse-related research studies in 2012 found negative effects on the following; 'Smoking Weed Doubles Car Crash Risk', 'Marijuana Withdrawal Causes Functional Impairment', 'Smoking Marijuana Doubles Risk of Testicular Cancer', 'Marijuana, Spice Use Can Affect Embryo's Brain', 'Treatment Can Reduce Financial Burden on Families', 'Why Do Domestic Violence Victims Recant?', 'Binge Drinking Bigger Problem Than Thought', 'Drinking Ups Risk of Benign Breast Disease' and 'Age 16 Peak Time for Teens to Start Drugs'.

Netherlands - Amsterdam bans smoking cannabis on school property

Amsterdam's mayor said he would formally ban students from smoking cannabis at school, making the city in the Netherlands the first to do so. A city spokeswoman, Iris Reshef, said schools have always forbidden cannabis, but found it difficult to enforce the policy when students smoked on or near campus. "It's not really what you have in mind as an educator, that children would be turning up for class stoned, or drunk either for that matter," she said. "But it has been a problem for some schools."

USA - Provider convicted in Montana medical pot case

A jury has convicted a ‘medical marijuana’ provider on drug trafficking charges in a major test of the U.S. government's raids of state regulated pot dispensaries in Montana.  The jury found Chris Williams guilty of all eight charges, including conspiracy to manufacture, possess and distribute marijuana and firearms charges. Williams wasn't permitted to argue that he followed state laws regulating ‘medical marijuana’. U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen agreed with government prosecutors who said state law doesn't matter in cases involving the USA federal Controlled Substances Act.

 Source

France - Government decides to keep ban on cannabis
The French Government announced that they will continue to ban the sale and use of cannabis, a day after Education Minister, Vincent Peillon, tried to defend his decriminalization of cannabis proposal. Minister Peillon’s proposal, who admitted his statements were a 'personal reflection', was rejected by the government during a press conference.
 Source

USA - High-Potency cannabis in Pregnancy Cause Brain Damage
New high potency marijuana and synthetic "weed" can interfere with early brain formation in developing fetuses as early as two weeks after conception, according to a new study. This is particularly troubling as marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug among pregnant women, the researchers at the Center for Genetic and Environmental Medicine at Texas A&MUniversity said. Exposure in early pregnancy is associated with anencephaly, a devastating birth defect in which infants are born without large parts of their brain or skull, the study found. The study also tied early prenatal use of these drugs to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities and memory problems in toddlers and 10-year- olds, as well as depression, aggression and anxiety in teens.

Source

USA - Federal police target LA in “medical marijuana” crackdown
Federal prosecutors have set their sights on Los Angeles, where city officials have struggled to stop a blooming of dispensaries. "As today's operations make clear, the sale and distribution of marijuana violates federal law, and we intend to enforce the law," U.S. Attorney Andre Birotte Jr. said. California's four U.S. attorneys pledged last October to curb pot collectives they said were running afoul of the law by raking in huge sums of money and serving as fronts for drug traffickers. Los Angeles is one of more than 175 California cities and 20 counties that have already banned retail pot shops.

Source

USA - Gabapentin Helps Cannabis Addicts Kick The Habit

Researchers found that the drug gabapentin, currently on the market to treat neuropathic pain and epilepsy, might also help people to quit smoking cannabis. Unlike traditional addiction treatments, gabapentin targets stress systems in the brain that are activated by drug withdrawal. In a 12-week trial of 50 treatment-seeking cannabis users, those who took gabapentin used less cannabis, experienced fewer withdrawal symptoms, like sleeplessness, and scored higher on tests of attention, impulse-control, and other cognitive skills, compared to patients who received a placebo. “A lot of other drugs have been tested for their ability to decrease cannabis use and withdrawal, but this is the first to show these key effects in a controlled treatment study,” said Barbara J. Mason at Scripps Research, who led the study.

Source

Scotland - Drug-linked deaths at record level: mostly methadone
Drug and drink-related deaths in Scotland have reached record levels. There were 584 recorded deaths in 2011, up 99 on the previous year and a 76% increase on 2001. Heroin substitute methadone was linked to 47% of those deaths, with heroin and morphine accounting for a third. The proportion of deaths related to methadone, which is prescribed to help heroin users kick their habit, showed ministers had to rethink their policy. Labor justice spokesman Lewis Macdonald said: "With a large proportion of deaths involving methadone, it would appear that the approach being taken to treatment isn't working properly…” Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson MSP added: "This appalling loss of life illustrates the human disaster that is the methadone program.”It would appear hundreds of families are being blighted by what is little more than legalized drug-taking on an industrial scale."

Source

 USA - Cannabis is large 'cash crop' with crime, violence as by products

Over the past several years, authorities say marijuana growing has been a factor in a number of home-invasion robberies. Stanislaus County District Attorney Birgit Fladager said, “Clearly, a lot of marijuana is being grown in the Central Valley ... and it is destined for the mass market and nationwide distribution, not cancer patients.” Modesto’s acting police chief, Gene Balentine, said there are marijuana raids almost daily. If you need more evidence that growing marijuana is a criminal enterprise, look at what those arrested in connection with the plots are carrying, guns, knives and other weapons, and often other drugs. This isn't what voters had in mind when they approved the so-called Compassionate Use Act.

Source

USA - Colorado “medical marijuana” diverted to teenagers  

Nearly three-quarters of teens in two metro-area substance abuse treatment programs said they have used state approved “medical marijuana” bought or grown for someone else, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Only one of the 122 teens in the study who admitted to using medical marijuana was an approved patient. Seventy-four percent of the teens said they had used other’s “medical marijuana”, with a median frequency of 50 times. The findings hint that the leaking of medical marijuana from the legal state system to illegal users may be common in Colorado. The report was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP).

USA - AACAP Policy Statement on marijuana used as medicine

In a statement published in June 2012, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) said it is concerned about the negative impact of marijuana decriminalized in some states for so-called medical reasons, on youth. “Adolescents are especially vulnerable to the many adverse developmental, cognitive, medical, psychiatric, and addictive effects of marijuana” the statement said. “Of particular concern to our field, adolescent marijuana users are more likely than adult users to develop marijuana dependence, and their heavy use is associated with increased incidence and worsened course of psychotic, mood, and anxiety disorders. Furthermore, marijuana's deleterious effects on cognition and brain development during adolescence may have lasting implications. The "medicalisation" of smoked marijuana has distorted the perception of the known risks and purported benefits of this drug. Since certain states began permitting dispensing of medical marijuana, adolescents' perceptions of the harmful effects of marijuana have decreased and marijuana use has increased significantly.“ 

  "Hey Georgy... our rights push us to be smoked.....untill death!"

    "Yea...it is our happy harm reduction drug...."

 USA - Little evidence of “medical marijuana” for treatment of depression

A new study finds little to no evidence that marijuana is an effective treatment for anxiety, migraines, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, azcentral.com reported. University of Arizona researchers, working on behalf of the state Department of Health Services, conducted a review of dozens of studies that looked at marijuana use in relation to the four medical conditions and found most of the research did not adequately show medicinal risks versus benefits of marijuana. While state officials have heard anecdotal evidence that marijuana can help the conditions, they say they will only base their decision on scientific evidence.

USA - Los Angeles to ban marijuana shops
The Los Angeles City Council voted to ban marijuana shops outright until it has clearer guidance from the state's highest court, after being unable to rein in the hundreds of medical marijuana dispensaries that have cropped up across the nation's second largest city. The 13-1 vote drew an angry, profanity-laced response from some medical marijuana advocates who attended the council meeting. If approved by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, the storefront ban would go into effect after 30 days. In the interim, letters will be sent to as many as 900 dispensaries advising them of the ban.

USA - Cannabis Use Found In 10% of Fibromyalgia Patients
Findings, published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), suggest that patients who self-medicate with cannabis have poorer mental health. The new research reveals that 10% of fibromyalgia (FM) patients use marijuana (dagga) for relief from symptoms such as widespread pain, fatigue, and insomnia caused by this chronic illness. In addition, a  77% unemployment rate was identified in marijuana users. "Physicians should be alert to potential negative mental health issues in FM patients using illicit drugs for medical purposes.” concludes Dr. Fitzcharles.

Nigeria - Drug abuse patients rise by 25%
AS the world commemorated the International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, experts have raised the alarm that incidences of drug abuse in the country have increased by 25 per cent in the last two years. Most worrisome, according to them, is that more children are getting involved in alcohol and substance abuse involving more danger to the drug addict population.

 Scotland – Drug-linked deaths at record level: mostly methadone  drugs poster smaller

Drug and drink-related deaths in Scotland have reached record levels. There were 584 recorded deaths in 2011 - up 99 on the previous year and a 76% increase on 2001. Heroin substitute methadone was linked to 47% of those deaths, with heroin and morphine accounting for a third. The proportion of deaths related to methadone, which is prescribed to help heroin users kick their habit, showed ministers had to rethink their policy. Labour justice spokesman Lewis Macdonald said: "With a large proportion of deaths involving methadone, it would appear that the approach being taken to treatment isn't working properly…” Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson MSP added: "This appalling loss of life illustrates the human disaster that is the methadone programme.”It would appear hundreds of families are being blighted by what is little more than legalised drug-taking on an industrial scale."

New Zealand - Young cannabis smokers run risk of lower IQ

Young people who smoke cannabis for years run the risk of a significant and irreversible reduction in their IQ, research said. The findings come from a study following around 1,000 people in New Zealand. An international team found those who started using cannabis below the age of 18 - while their brains were still developing - suffered a drop in IQ. The more that people smoked, the greater the loss in IQ. The researchers, writing in the US journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, wrote: "Persistent cannabis use over 20 years was associated with neuropsychological decline, and greater decline was evident for more persistent users."

Australia - Dagga (marijuana) causes brain damage

Australian scientists have verified again that persistent heavy marijuana use damages the brain's memory and learning capacity. Researchers also showed for the first time the earlier people developed their cannabis habit, the worse the damage. Scientists from Melbourne's Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (MCRI), Melbourne University and Wollongong University used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to scan the brains of 59 people who had been using marijuana for 15 years on average. The scans showed changes to the volume, strength and integrity of white matter, the brain's complex wiring system. Long-term heavy cannabis users showed disruptions in the white matter fibres. There was a reduction in the volume of white matter of more than 80 per cent in the users studied.  Cannabis interferes with naturally occurring cannabinoid receptors in the brain. "

USA - Gabapentin Helps Cannabis Addicts Kick The Habit

 Researchers found that the drug gabapentin, currently on the market to treat neuropathic pain and epilepsy, might also help people to quit smoking cannabis. Unlike traditional addiction treatments, gabapentin targets stress systems in the brain that are activated by drug withdrawal. In a 12-week trial of 50 treatment-seeking cannabis users, those who took gabapentin used less cannabis, experienced fewer withdrawal symptoms, like sleeplessness, and scored higher on tests of attention, impulse-control, and other cognitive skills, compared to patients who received a placebo. “A lot of other drugs have been tested for their ability to decrease cannabis use and withdrawal, but this is the first to show these key effects in a controlled treatment study,” said Barbara J. Mason at Scripps Research, who led the study.

USA - Cannabis is large 'cash crop' with crime, violence as by products

Over the past several years, authorities say marijuana growing has been a factor in a number of home-invasion robberies. Stanislaus County District Attorney Birgit Fladager said, “Clearly, a lot of marijuana is being grown in the Central Valley ... and it is destined for the mass market and nationwide distribution — not cancer patients.” Modesto’s acting police chief, Gene Balentine, said there are marijuana raids almost daily. If you need more evidence that growing marijuana is a criminal enterprise, look at what those arrested in connection with the plots are carrying — guns, knives and other weapons, and often other drugs. This isn't what voters had in mind when they approved the so-called Compassionate Use Act.

USA - 578 000 dagga plants uprooted in US
More than 578 000 cannabis plants, worth over $1 billion, have been uprooted from forests and national parks in a major operation in the western United States. The two-month enforcement operation, which began July 1, in seven states was led by the nation's anti-drug and forest authorities. Most of the illegal plantations were discovered in the liberal “medical marijuana”California, where a estimated 484 000 marijuana plants were.

Yale Study: Dagga (marijuana) is Gateway Drug

Yale University School of Medicine study, which appears online, showed that alcohol, cigarettes and marijuana were associated with an increased likelihood of prescription drug abuse in men 18 to 25. In women of that age, only marijuana use was linked with a higher likelihood of prescription drug abuse. The Yale researchers focused on a sample of 55,215 18- to 25-year-olds. Of those about 12 percent, reported that they were abusing prescription opioids. Of the group abusing these drugs, about 57 percent had used alcohol, 56 percent had smoked cigarettes and 34 percent had used marijuana. Those who had used marijuana were 2.5 times more likely than those their age who abstained to later dabble in prescription drugs.  


Read 618 times Last modified on Friday, 14 November 2014 11:26
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